EMERGENCY TIPS

Fire & Smoke Damage

After fire damage it is natural to want to jump right in and clean the building and contents.  Timely action can be a great help, but incorrect action can jeopardize or impede satisfactory restoration.

do…

do not…

 

Water Damage

Water damage arises from fire damage, broken pipes, blocked drains, malfunctioning appliances, storms and other causes.  The appropriate treatment depends on the nature of the damage.  Some water carries contaminants and should be considered hazardous (see Sewage and Flood Damage below).  Whatever the origin, the prospects for restoration depend largely on the speed with which your building and personal property can be dried.  Even clean water can generate mildew and other bacterial growth if neglected.

do…

do not…

Sewage & Flood Damage

Raw sewage and flood waters contain bacteria and other micro organisms which are extremely hazardous to human health.  These can be transmitted by touching contaminated items or by tracking them into uncontaminated areas on shoes.  Children and pets are especially vulnerable.  Frequent hand washing is an important preventive measure.  Absorbent materials such as carpeting and drywall may not be restorable after direct contact with sewage-contaminated or flood contaminated water.

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do not…

Soot (Furnace) Damage

While soot may resemble smoke residues from a fire, the restoration of soot damage often requires different techniques.  Incorrect action can make restoration more difficult and delay the return to normal.

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do not…

 

Vandalism Damage

Vandalism often involves spray paint on walls defacement of furnishings, or spreading noxious substances.  It is one of the most difficult forms of damage to restore.  Prompt action can often minimize the effect of vandalism or make restoration more successful.

do…

do not…

Water, Water Everywhere